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Gotthard Deutsch, Ph.D.

Professor of Jewish History, Hebrew Union College, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Contributions:
COVO – Name of a Jewish family of Salonica, Turkey, a branch of which lives at Widdin, Bulgaria. As the name indicates, the family was originally of Covo, near Milan, Italy. There have been several rabbis of this name.D.Asher Covo, or...
CREIZENACH, MICHAEL – German educator and theologian; born in Mayence May 16, 1789; died in Frankfort-on-the-Main Aug. 5, 1842. Creizenach is one of the most typical representatives of the era of transition, following the epoch of Mendelssohn, whose...
CRESCENZI, ALEXANDER – Jewish convert to Christianity; lived at Rome in the seventeenth century. In 1666 he translated from the Spanish into Italian Antony Colmenarde Ludesina's treatise on chocolate, printed with notes by Alexander Vitrioli, Rome,...
CRIMINALITY – The average tendency to commit crime. The critics of the Jews have always contended that the general standard of morality among the Jews was lower than that of their Christian neighbors, and their tendency toward crime therefore...
CROATIA – Earliest Mention. Southwestern part of the Hungarian crown provinces; consists of Croatia, Slavonia, and the Military Frontier, included since 1868. The earliest allusion to Jews in Croatia is found in a letter of the Spanish...
DALBERG, KARL THEODOR, BARON VON – Archbishop of Mayence and subsequently Grand Duke of Frankfort-on-the-Main; born Feb. 8, 1744; died Feb. 10, 1817. He was one of the noblest German princes and statesmen, and took a friendly and liberal attitude toward the Jews....
DALPUGET – Family of merchants; settled at Bordeaux, France. They originally came from Avignon, and refused to obey the decree of expulsion from Bordeaux passed by the jurats and Parliament of that city in 1734 at the request of the...
DAMASCUS AFFAIR – Accusation of ritual murder brought against the Jews of Damascus in 1840. At that time Damascus, together with Syria, belonged to Mohammed Ali, pasha of Egypt, who had revolted against the authority of his suzerain, the sultan...
DANZIG – Capital of West Prussia. The Jewish population of Danzig in 1895 was 2,474, in a total population of 125,605.The Five Congregations. The oldest document concerning the Jews of Danzig, a charter of King Casimir authorizing two...
DARDANELLES – Name of the two cities situated opposite each other on the shores of the strait at the entrance to the Sea of Marmora. The European city is inhabited byMohammedans exclusively; the Asiatic city contains Mohammedans, Greeks,...
DEBORAH – A Jewish weekly in the German language, founded in 1855 by Isaac M. Wise and Max Lilienthal in Cincinnati, Ohio, for German immigrants who had not mastered English. It was planned as a German supplement to the American...
DECKERT, FRANCIS – Clerical anti-Semitic agitator; born at Vienna 1846; died there March 21, 1901. From its beginning in the eighth decade of the nineteenth century Deckert was identified, as a political agitator and writer, with the anti-Semitic...
DEDE AGATCH – Turkish port on the Ægean Sea, at the mouth of the Maritza, near Enos, European Turkey. It has about two hundred Jews in a population of three thousand. The community, founded in 1870, possesses a synagogue, and a primary school...
DELMEDIGO – A family of German descent. About the end of the fourteenth century its founder, Judah Delmedigo, emigrated to the island of Crete, whose inhabitants were mostly of German origin (compare Joseph Solomon Delmedigo, "Elim," p. 30,...
DENMARK – A kingdom of northwestern Europe. The first mention of the Danes in Jewish literature occurs in the "Yosippon" (ed. Breithaupt, pp. 8, 547; compare Jerahmeel, transl. Gaster, p. 68), where the Dodanim mentioned in the Bible...
DEPPING, GEORGES BERNARD – German-French historian; born in Münster, Germany, May 11, 1784; died in Paris Sept. 5, 1853. He went to Paris in 1803, where he lived as teacher and writer. Besides other historical works, he wrote: "Les Juifs dans le Moyen...
DEUTSCH (AARON), DAVID – Hungarian rabbi and Talmudic author; born in Raudnitz, Bohemia, about 1812; died at Balassa-Gyarmath, Hungary, April 26, 1878. He received his early education under his grandfather, Joseph Deutsch, who was rabbi in Raudnitz, and...
DEZA, DIEGO DE – Second inquisitor-general; Bishop of Salamanca, and professor of theology at the university of that city; subsequently Archbishop of Seville, in which city he died 1506; friend and protector of Christopher Columbus. After Tomas...
DIDEROT, DENIS – French philosopher and encyclopedist; born at Langres Oct. 5, 1713; died at Paris July 30, 1784. Although, like all the French encyclopedists, an apostle of tolerance, Diderot does not seem to have had much sympathy with the...
DOBRITZ – Town in Bulgaria, twenty-six miles north of Varna. It contains about 200 Jews in a total population of 14,000. This little community, which was founded in 1870, is administered by three of the leading Jews. It has a synagogue,...
DOHM, CHRISTIAN WILHELM VON – German historian and political writer; advocate of the Jews, and friend of Moses Mendelssohn; born in Lemgo Dec. 11, 1751; died on his estate near Nordhausen May 29, 1820. Dohm, who was deeply moved by the humanitarian ideals of...
DRAMA – City of European Turkey in the vilayet of Salonica, 25 miles from Serrès. It is the ancient Drabescus. Its small Jewish community, which was founded in 1860 by immigrants from Serrès and Monastir, possesses a synagogue, and a...
DRUMONT, EDOUARD ADOLPHE – French anti-Semitic author and former deputy from Algeria; born at Paris on May 3, 1844. Drumont's ancestry is not Jewish, as has been sometimes asserted. His ancestors came from Lille, where they were porcelain-painters....
DUBNICZA – Bulgarian town; 22 miles south of Sofia, and on the left bank of the Jerma. In tracing the origin of its population by the names of the families at present found there, one discovers French, Spanish, Arabian, Hungarian, and...
DUPORT, ADRIEN – French lawyer and friend of the Jews; born in 1758; died in exile 1798. He became a deputy to the States-General in 1789, and from the first was a member of the Jacobin party. After the arrest of Louis XVI. in June, 1791, Duport...