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S. Mendelsohn, Ph.D.

Rabbi, Temple of Israel, Wilmington, N. C.

Contributions:
ABIN NAGGARA – A Babylonian amora of the second and third generations. A carpenter by trade, he devoted his nights to study; and Rab Huna I., noticing the constant light in Abin's home, foretold that learned sons would issue from that house....
ABIN B. NAḤMAN – A beloved disciple of R. Judah ben Ezekiel (B. M. 107a). He is mentioned as a transmitter of Baraitot (Yeb. 84b; B. B. 94b).S. M.
ABIN BEN TANḤUM BAR ṬERIFON – A Palestinian scholar who, by a curious calculation, tries to prove that the Biblical saying, "That soul shall be cut off from his people" (Gen. xvii. 14), signifies a premature death before the expiration of the fiftieth year...
ABINA – An amora of the third and fourth centuries, always cited without any cognomen. He was a Babylonian by birth, a disciple of Rab Huna I., and befriended by Geniba (Giṭ. 65b; Yer. Giṭ. vi. 48a), in whose name he reports a Halakah...
ADDA – The name of two amoraim, neither of whom had a distinguishing patronymic or cognomen. The elder was a Palestinian, and lived in the first generation (third century). He was a colleague of R. Jonathan (Yer. Ter. x. 47b). The...
ADDA B. ABIMI (BIMI) – A Palestinian amora of the fourth generation, disciple of R. Ḥanina b. Pappi, and contemporary of R. Hezekiah. It is surmised that his patronymic Abimi was changed into Ukmi or Ikkuma, that is, "the Dark," because his memory was...
ADDA B. AHABAH (AḤWAH) – 1. A Babylonian amora of the second generation (third and fourth centuries), frequently quoted in both the Jerusalem and the Babylonian Talmud. He is said to have been born on the day that Rabbi (Judah I.) died (Ḳid 72a, b; Gen....
ADDA OF CÆSAREA (KISRIN) – A disciple of R. Johanan, and a teacher in the third amoraic generation. Because of his cognomen he is erroneously supposed to have been the son of R. Abbahu of Cæsarea (Abbahu II.; Yer. Ber. 4, 8c; Yer. M. Ḳ. iii. 82c; Bab....
ADDA B. ḤUNYA – The homiletic observation on Eccl. i. 4 ("One generation passeth away, and another generation cometh: but the earth abideth forever") has thus been transmitted by him: "Consider the present generation as good as the generation...
ADDA B. MATNA – A Babylonian amora of the fourth century, disciple of Abaye and of Raba. He appears to have obtained some halakic information from Rabina I., and in his later years to have associated with Rabina II. To satisfy his thirst for...
ADDA, MESHOḤAAH – A disciple of R. Judah b. Ezekiel, who instructed Raba how to measure city limits for the regulation of Sabbath walks ('Er. 56b, B. M. 107b). S. M.
ADDA B. MINYOMI – A Babylonian amora of the third century, junior contemporary of Rabina I. and of Huna Mar b. Iddi. He is sometimes quoted anonymously as "The Court of Nehardea" (B. Ḳ. 31b, Ḥul. 49a, Sanh. 17b). S. M.
ADDA B. SIMON – A Palestinian amora, who is known chiefly for ethical rules quoted in the name of his predecessors (Yer. Ber. ii. 4d; Yer. Meg. 1, 71c; Eccl. R. iv. 17). S. M.
ADMON B. GADDAI – One of three police-court judges in Jerusalem mentioned in the Talmud—the others being Ḥanan b. Abishalom (Ḥanan the Egyptian) and Nahum the Median. Altogether there were nearly four hundred such judges in Jerusalem; but only...
AḤA – The name of nearly fourscore rabbis quoted in the Talmud and in midrashic literature. Some of these are misnamed through the errors of copyists; others appear but once or twice, and, consequently, can not be identified with any...
AḤA (AḤAI) I. – A tanna of the second century, junior contemporary of Simon ben Yoḥai, with whom, as well as with others of the fourth and fifth tannaitic generations, he appears in halakic disputations. While he is, therefore, best known as a...
AḤA (AḤAI) II. – A Palestinian amora of the first amoraic generation (third century), surnamed Berabbi, Ha-Gadol or Roba ("the Great"). He systematized Baraitot at the Academy of Ḥiya ha-Gadol, and was teacher of Samuel ha-ZaḲen (Ber. 14a; Yer....
AḤA (AḤAI) III. – A Palestinian amora of the fourth century and associate of the most prominent teachers of the fourth amoraic generation, R. Jonah and R. Yose II. He was a native of Lydda in southern Palestine, but settled in Tiberias, where...
AḤA – Brother of Abba, the father of Jeremiah b. Abba; a contemporary of Abba Arika (third century). The latter said that in the history of the world there never had been a man so penitent as King Josiah, and after him came Aḥa, the...
AḤA B. ADDA – An amora of the fourth century; born and educated in Palestine. He emigrated to Babylonia, where he became a disciple of Rab Judah ben Ezekiel and of Rab Hamnuna II. He frequently reported decisions of his Palestinian teachers....
AḤA B. AWYA – A Babylonian halakist of the third generation of Amoraim. He once visited Palestine, where he attended the lectures of Rab Assi (Yasa I.), and seems to have met Rabbi Johanan. He was a disciple of Rab Ḥisda in Babylonia, and...
AḤA BARDALA – A Babylonian amora of the first generation, a contemporary of Abba Areka (Suk. 26a; Beẓah, 14a; Giṭ. 14a). S. M.
AḤA OF DIFTI – A Babylonian amora of the sixth generation (fifth century), frequently found in halakic discussion with Rabina II. For a time he acted as counselor (ḥakam) of the exilarch (resh galuta) Mar Zuṭra I. (441-450). After the death of...
AḤA (AḤAI) B. ḤANINA – A Palestinian amora of the third and fourth centuries. He collected rare Baraitot among the leading scholars of Daroma in southern Judea, which he communicated to his colleagues elsewhere, even as far as the Babylonian...
AḤA BAR HUNA – A Babylonian amora of the fourth generation, disciple of Rabbah b. Naḥmani and of Sheshet. Ḥisda, another teacher of Aḥa, employed him for his halakic correspondence with Raba ben Joseph, who recognized in him a great and wise...