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The unedited full-text of the 1906 Jewish Encyclopedia
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NEVAKHOVICH, LÖB – Russian writer; born in Letichev, Volhynia, in the second half of the eighteenth century; died in St. Petersburg Aug. 1 (13), 1831. As the friend and protégé of Abram Peretz he went to St. Petersburg toward the end of the reign...
NEVERS – Chief city of the department of the Nièvre, France, with a population of 27,108 (1904). In the twelfth century Jews were permitted to reside at Nevers on condition of paying to the seigniors of the city a tax of five sous per...
NEW ERA ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE – A monthly publication founded in Boston, Mass., as the New Era Jewish Magazine, by Raphael Lasker, in June, 1902. Its title was changed and it became the property of the New Era Illustrated Magazine Company in Oct., 1903, when...
NEW HAMPSHIRE – One of the New England states of the United States of America, and one of the thirteen original states. Record is found as early as 1693 of one Aaron Moses of New Castle; and a local historian refers to the Moses and Abrams...
NEW HAVEN – See Connecticut.
NEW JERSEY – One of the North Atlantic states and one of the thirteen original states of the United States of America. It contains the following Jewish communities:Asbury Park, with a congregation, Sons of Israel.Atlantic City, with a large...
NEW MEXICO – A territory in the western division of the United States; acquired after the war with Mexico by the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, ratified May 30, 1848. The earliest Jewish settler in New Mexico was Jacob Spiegelberg, who went to...
NEW MOON – The period of New Moon was, in pre-exilic times, celebrated by cessation of labor; it was superior even to the Sabbath-day, which formed but a part of it (see I Sam. xx. 18-34; II Kings iv. 23; Amos viii. 5; Hos. ii. 13 [A. V....
NEW MOON, BLESSING OF THE – The periodical reappearance of the moon, like the reappearance of everything that is a benefit to mankind, such as fruits in their respective seasons, should be recognized by praise and gratitude to the Creator. The benediction...
NEW NINEVEH – See Mosul.
NEW ORLEANS – Largest city in the state of Louisiana, which passed into the possession of the United States in 1803. Among its earliest Jewish settlers were Jacob and Judah Touro, the latter of whom fought in defense of the city, under...
NEW SOUTH WALES – See Australia; Sydney.
NEW TESTAMENT – Historical Books: The name of "New Testament" was given by the Christian Church, at the close of the second century, to the gospels and to other apostolic writings, inasmuch as they were composed with the purpose of showing that...
NEW-YEAR – Biblical Data: In the earliest times the Hebrew year began in autumn with the opening of the economic year. There followed in regular succession the seasons of seed-sowing, growth and ripening of the corn under the influence of...
NEW-YEAR FOR TREES – Arbor Day. The anniversary of the festival of trees, which occurs on the 15th of Shebaṭ (roughly corresponding to Feb. 1), is known as "Ḥamishshah 'Asar bi-Shebaṭ," or as "Ḥamishshah 'Asar" (= "the fifteenth"), and is celebrated...
NEW YORK – Chief commercial city of the state of New York and the largest city of the United States; contains a larger Jewish population than any other city in the world.History: When Jews settled in New York, about 1654, during the Dutch...
NEW YORK – Most populous state of the American Union, with an estimated Jewish population of 750,000. The history of the Jews of the state is practically covered by the articles New York (city), Albany, etc. Their records date back to 1654...
NEW ZEALAND – Affected by Russian Persecutions. A group of islands in the South Pacific Ocean, consisting of two large islands (North Island and South Island), a small island known as Stewart Island, and numerous islets along the coast....
NEWARK – Largest city of the state of New Jersey, U. S. A. Its first Jewish congregation was founded Aug. 20, 1848, under the name "B'nai Jeshurun." Religious services were held at various places until 1858, when the first synagogue was...
NEWBURGER, JOSEPH E. – American jurist; born in New York city 1853; educated in the public schools and at Columbia College (School of Law), New York (LL.B.); admitted to the bar 1874. In 1891 he was elected judge of the city court of New York, and...
NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE – English seaport; center of the English coal-trade. It has a population of 214,803, including about 500 Jewish families. Jews are mentioned in connection with Newcastle-upon-Tyne before the expulsion, but the present, community...
NEWMAN, ALFRED ALVAREZ – English metal-worker and art-collector; born in London 1851; died there 1887. He revived the blacksmith's art in its medieval phases and was the founder of the Old English smithy in Archer street, Haymarket,London. Being a...
NEWMAN, LEOPOLD – American soldier. He entered in the Civil war as captain of Company B, 31st New York Infantry, and rose to the rank of lieutenant-colonel. His term of service expired a few days prior to the battle of Chancellorsville (May 2,...
NEWMAN, SELIG – German Hebraist; born at Posen, Prussian Poland, in 1788; died at Williamsburg, N. Y., Feb. 20, 1871. He was educated at Posen, but in 1814 went to England and was appointed minister to the Plymouth congregation, teaching Hebrew...
NEWPORT – One of the capitals of the state of Rhode Island, U. S. A. Before the American Revolution, Newport excelled New York as a commercial center and port of entry; to-day, however, it is no longer of commercial importance, but has...