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Meyer Kayserling,

(deceased), Late Rabbi, Budapest, Hungary.

Contributions:
CIUDAD REAL – Capital of the former province of La Mancha (now the province of Ciudad Real) in New Castile, founded in 1255 by Don Alfonso X. of Castile. Among its first inhabitants were Jews as well as Moors, the former of whom, chiefly from...
CLAVA, ISAIAH – Spanish poet of Amsterdam. He translated from Hebrew into Spanish a Purim song, under the title "Cancio de Purim, Establecido Sobre su Historia, Echo por un Anonimo,y Ahora Nuevamente Sacado del Hebrayco al Espagnol,"Amsterdam,...
COHEN, ABRAHAM – Assistant rabbi in Tunis; died 1840 at Safed, whither he had made a pilgrimage in his old age. He was a grandson of one of the earliest rabbis in Tunis. His book, "Abraham Yagel" (Abraham Will Rejoice), a work loosely arranged...
COHEN, SAUL – African rabbi; born in Djerba, North Africa, in 1772; died there April, 1848. Although blind and very poor, he was the author of the following publications: "Netib Miẓwoteka" (The Path of Thy Commandments), a work containing...
COHEN-CARLOS, DAVID – A writer resident in Hamburg in the seventeenth century. In 1631 he either translated the Song of Songs into Spanish or transliterated a Ladino translation of it (written in Hebrew letters) into Latin characters. The work is...
COIMBRA – City of Portugal, capital of the province of Beira, in which there was formerly a "Juderia," or Jewish quarter, now called "Corpo de Deus." In April, 1395, the prior of the church in Coimbra and several of the clergy broke into...
COLUMBUS, CHRISTOPHER, AND THE JEWS – According to his own statement, Columbus had constant intercourse with Jews and Moors, with priests and laymen. He had personal relations with the mathematician Joseph Vecinho, physician-in-ordinary to King João II. of Portugal,...
CORDOVA – A city in Andalusia, Spain. As early as the eighth century it included Jews among its inhabitants. They lived in a separate quarter or "Juderia," one of the gates of which was called "Bab al-Yahud," now the Almodovar gate. At...
CORDOVA, ISAAC HEZEKIAH B. JACOB – Publisher in the latter part of the seventeenth and the first part of the eighteenth century; son of Jacob b. Moses Raphael de Cordova. After a sojourn in Brazil, he settled in Amsterdam, where, like his brother Abraham, he...
CORDOVA, JOSHUA HEZEKIAH DE – Rabbi and preacher in Amsterdam about the middle of the eighteenth century; author of "Sermam Moral que Neste K. K. de Talmud Torah Pregou em Sabb. Bamidbar, 5 Siwan, 5504", Amsterdam, 1744.Bibliography: Kayserling, Bibl....
CORONEL, PAUL NUÑEZ – Spanish Orientalist; born at Segovia; died Sept. 30, 1534. Though baptized before the expulsion of the Jews from Spain in 1492, he was educated for the rabbinate, became conversant with Hebrew and with Biblical literature, and...
CORREA, ISABELLA (REBECCA) – Spanish poetess of the seventeenth century; born in Spain; lived successively in Brussels, Antwerp, and Amsterdam; wife of the cosmographer D. Nicolas de Olivier y Fullana (Daniel Judah) of Majorca. Isabella Correa was a friend...
COSTA, ISAAC DA – Dutch poet; born Jan. 14, 1798, at Amsterdam; died there April 28, 1860. His father, Daniel da Costa, a relative of Uriel Acosta, was a prominent merchant in the city of Amsterdam; his mother, Rebecca Ricardo, was a near...
COSTA, JOSEPH DA – 1. Younger brother of Uriel Acosta or da Costa, to whom Manasseh Ben Israel dedicated his Spanish edition of the "Hope of Israel" (1650); lived at Amsterdam.2. Relative of the preceding; wrote "Tratado de Cortesia y Politica"...
COTA, RODRIGO – Spanish poet; born at Toledo; died 1497. He came of a Marano family, three members of which—Francisco Cota, Lopez Cota, and Juan Fernandez Cota—were employed by the state, and were deprived of their offices in 1450. It is...
COURT JEWS – Position and Duties. Court Jews, called also court factors, and court or chamber agents, played a part at the courts of the Austrian emperors and the German princes in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries and at the...
COUTINHO (CUITIÑO, V04p317004.jpg) – Name of a Jewish-Portuguese family, members of which, during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, resided in Amsterdam, Hamburg, Brazil, and the West Indies.1. Abraham Pereyra Coutinho: Mentioned as living in Amsterdam in...
COUTINHO, FERNANDO – Defender of the Jews, councilor of the supreme court, and afterward Bishop of Silves, in the reigns of Manuel and João III. of Portugal. When, in Feb., 1497, Manuel agitated the question of compulsory baptism of the Jews,...
COVILHÃO – City in the province of Beira, Portugal, which in the thirteenth century had a Jewish congregation and was the seat of a district rabbi. After the banishment of the Jews from Portugal, many Maranos resided in Covilhão, where...
CRESCAS, ABIATHARIBN, HA-KOHEN – Physician in ordinary to King Juan II. of Aragon (1458-79); skilful oculist and learned astrologer. In Sept., 1468, he freed the king, who was seventy years of age, from a double cataract of the eyes, which had caused his total...
CRESCAS, VIDAL, DE CASLAR – Physician and liturgical poet of Avignon; member of the Yiẓhari family of that place. In 1327 Crescas translated into Hebrew the "Regimen Sanitatis" of his contemporary, the Spanish physician Arnold de Villanueva, under the...
CUENCA – City in New Castile, Spain, which, after its conquest by Alfonso VII., possessed Jewish inhabitants. In the "fuero," or charter, granted to the city about 1189, the king secured to the Jews full personal protection, together...
CULI, JACOB – Talmudist and Biblical commentator of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries; died at Constantinople Aug. 9, 1732. He belonged to an exiled Spanish family, and was the grandson and pupil of Moses ibn Ḥabib. He edited various...
DAGOBERT – King of France (602-638). In order to emulate the religious zeal of Heraclius and Sisebut, the rulers of the Byzantine and West-Gothic empires, who were persecuting the Jews,Dagobert decreed, about 629, that the Jews who were...
DANIELILLO OF LEGHORN – Anonymous author of a small apologetic work of the seventeenth century, written in Spanish, which Grätz erroneously considers to be pseudepigraphic. It was copied by Isaac Mendes in 1738, and published at Brussels in 1868, under...