JewishEncyclopedia.com

The unedited full-text of the 1906 Jewish Encyclopedia
- Phrase search: "names of god"
- Exclude terms: "names of god" -zerah
- Volume/Page: v9 p419
- Diacritics optional: Ḥanukkah or hanukkah
- Search by Author: altruism author:Hirsch
search tips & recommendations

A. M. Friedenberg, B.S., LL.B.

Counselor at Law, New York City.

Contributions:
BINGEN – City of Hesse, situated on the Rhine. Jews lived there from the earliest times, for they are mentioned by the traveler Benjamin of Tudela, who visited Bingen toward the middle of the twelfth century. In May, 1254, Bingen joined...
BLOCH, LOUIS – Swiss educator; born in 1864; since 1896 privat-docent in archeology and mythology at the University of Zurich. Bloch has written extensively on classical life and literature, Latin and Greek mythology, archeology, and on...
BLOGG – German author; native of Neuwägen in Hanover; died Feb. 11, 1858. He was a teacher of the Hebrew language, and founded Telgener's printing-press at Hanover in 1827. At the time of his death he was nearly eighty years old, and...
BLOSZ, KARL – German painter; born at Mannheim Nov. 24, 1860. He studied at the art school in Carlsruhe from 1880 to 1883, and was a pupil of K. Hoff and of Von Lindenschmid of the Munich Academy from 1883 to 1887. Since 1887 he has worked...
BLUMENBERG, LEOPOLD – American soldier; born in the province of Brandenburg, Prussia, Sept. 28, 1827; died at Baltimore Aug. 12, 1876. He was the son of Abraham and Sophia Blumenberg, and the twenty-first of a family of twenty-two children. Soon...
BODENSTEIN, JULIUS – German landscape-painter; born in Berlin Aug. 4, 1847. He studied at the Berlin Academy under Schütze and Hermann Schnee, and in 1873 went to Munich, where he became a pupil of Ad. Lier. He is prominent as a painter of subjects...
BORCHARDT, FELIX – German painter; born in Berlin March 7, 1857; studied at the Berlin Academy and with Max Michael; traveled extensively in Italy, France, Holland, and Spain, remaining five years in Spain. He is now (1902) a resident of Dresden...
BORDEAUX – In medieval times capital of Guienne; to-day, of the department of La Gironde, France. It derives its name from Bourdelois, the district in which it is situated.According to a legend, the Jews settled at Bordeaux shortly after...
BREIER, EDUARD – Austrian writer; born at Warasdin in Croatia Nov. 3, 1811; died at Zaiwitz near Znaim, Moravia, June 3, 1886. His first novel, "Der Fluch des Rabbi," published in 1840, was written in eleven days, during his furlough while an...
BRIEG – Town in Silesia; formerly the capital of the duchy of the same name. Jews settled there about 1324, chiefly because it was situated on the commercial route to Breslau, in which place a colony of Jews had long resided. The Jewish...
BRUCHSAL – City in the grand duchy of Baden. Jews resided here as early as the beginning of the twelfth century. In 1337 the Jews of Bruchsal joined with those of a number of other places in paying an annual tribute of 700 marks (in lieu...
BRUNSWICK – Duchy of Germany, the capital of which has the same name. The first settlement of Jews in the duchy was at Blankenburg; for a record states that in 1241 the abbess of Quedlinburg owed Jacob, a Jew, probably the first one in...
BUSH, LEWIS – American soldier; born in Philadelphia; died 1777; member of the well-known Bush family, Jewish merchants of Philadelphia. He received the commission of first lieutenant of the Sixth Pennsylvania Battalion Jan. 9, 1776, and was...
BUSH, SOLOMON – American soldier; born in Philadelphia; son of Matthias Bush, one of the signers of the non-importation agreement (Oct. 25, 1765).Solomon Bush was an officer in the Pennsylvania militia, 1777-87. On July 5, 1777, he was...
CARNIVAL – Among the Romans, a period of gaiety during the weeks before Lent, in which the Jews were made to play a contemptuous part. While the carnival had existed from the earliest medieval period, its scope was considerably extended by...
CATECHUMENS, HOUSE OF – Burden of Support Put on the Jews. A Roman institution for converting Jews to Catholicism, which the Jews, by means of taxes, were compelled to support. The Vatican founded this house for converts March 21, 1548 (Rieger, ii....
CHARITY AND CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS – The Lord's Share. —Ancient and Medieval Times. Charity is kindness shown to the needy; Hebrew, "ẓedaḳah"="righteousness" (Deut. xxiv. 13; Isa. xxxii. 17; Prov. xiv. 34; Ps. cvi. 3; Dan. iv. 24); "gemilut ḥesed" or "gemilut...
CHILD, THE – Since the days of Abraham (Gen. xv. 2), to possess a child was always considered as the greatest blessing God could bestow; and to be without children was regarded as the greatest curse. The Rabbis regarded the childless man as...
COHN, ADOLPHE – American philologist; born at Paris May 29, 1851. He was graduated "bachelier ès lettres" from the University of Paris in 1868, and studied law, historical criticism, and philology at various institutions of higher learning in...
DALPUGET – Family of merchants; settled at Bordeaux, France. They originally came from Avignon, and refused to obey the decree of expulsion from Bordeaux passed by the jurats and Parliament of that city in 1734 at the request of the...
DOHM, CHRISTIAN WILHELM VON – German historian and political writer; advocate of the Jews, and friend of Moses Mendelssohn; born in Lemgo Dec. 11, 1751; died on his estate near Nordhausen May 29, 1820. Dohm, who was deeply moved by the humanitarian ideals of...
DRUMONT, EDOUARD ADOLPHE – French anti-Semitic author and former deputy from Algeria; born at Paris on May 3, 1844. Drumont's ancestry is not Jewish, as has been sometimes asserted. His ancestors came from Lille, where they were porcelain-painters....
DUPORT, ADRIEN – French lawyer and friend of the Jews; born in 1758; died in exile 1798. He became a deputy to the States-General in 1789, and from the first was a member of the Jacobin party. After the arrest of Louis XVI. in June, 1791, Duport...
ECK, JOHANN MAIER VON – Catholic theologian; born at Eck, Bavaria, Nov. 13, 1486; died in Ingolstadt Feb. 10, 1543. One of the most active antagonists of Luther, he was an equally zealous enemy of the Jews. His work, "Verlegung eines Juden-Büchleins,...
EMANU-EL – A weekly journal published in San Francisco, Cal. The first number was issued in May, 1895. Jacob Voorsanger is the editor. It is devoted especially to the interests of Jews and Judaism on the Pacific coast.G. A. M. F....