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Eduard Neumann, Ph.D.

Chief Rabbi, Nagy-Kanizsa, Hungary.

Contributions:
ARAD (ALT-ARAD) – Early History. Interior of the Synagogue at Arad.(From a photograph.) A royal free city and market town of Hungary, on the Maros, 145 miles southeast of Budapest. Among the Jewish communities of Hungary that of Arad holds a...
BACHER, SIMON – Neo-Hebraic poet; born Feb. 1, 1823, in Liptó-Szent-Miklós, Hungary died at Budapest Nov. 9, 1891. Bacher, whose name was originally Bachrach, came of a family of scholars, and counted as one of his ancestors the well-known Jair...
BAJA – City on the Danube, in the county of Bács-Bodrog, Hungary. As early as the end of the eighteenth century, Baja, owing to its favorable location, was a bustling commercial town. The first Jewish families probably settled there...
BLOCH (BALLAGI), MORITZ – Hungarian Christian theologian and lexicographer; born March 18, 1815, at Inócz, Zemplén, Hungary; died Sept. 1, 1891, at Budapest. He was the son of a tenant-farmer, from whom he received his first instruction in the Bible and...
BRECHER, ADOLPH – Austrian physician; born at Prossnitz, Moravia, in 1831; died at Olmütz April 13, 1894. He was the son of the physician Gideon Brecher. Adolph Brecher, after attending the gymnasia at Presburg and Prague, studied in Nikolsburg...
DAVID BEN ZAKKAI – Exilarch; known in Jewish history especially for his controversy with Saadia; died in 940. He was a relative of the prince of the Exile, 'Uḳba, who had been deposed from office and banished, and was his successor in the...
DELMEDIGO, JUDAH B. ELIJAH – Italian Talmudist; born in Candia; son of the philosopher Elijah Cretensis Delmedigo; studied at Padua under Judah Minz; he then returned to his native city, where his reputation as teacher of the Talmud attracted many pupils,...
DEMETRIUS – Son-in-law of King Agrippa I. When Mariamne II., daughter of Agrippa I. and sister of Agrippa II., had put away Archelaus, the son of Chelcias, she married Demetrius, who was by birth and wealth among the foremost Jews of...
JOSEPH BEN JOSHUA BEN MEÏR HA-KOHEN – Historian and physician of the sixteenth century; born at Avignon Dec. 20, 1496; died at Genoa in 1575 or shortly after. His family originally lived at Cuenca, then at Chuete, Spain; when the Jews were expelled from Spain it...
LUZZATTO (LUZZATTI) – Name of a family of Italian scholars whose genealogy can be traced back to the first half of the sixteenth century. According to a tradition communicated by S. D. Luzzatto the family descends from a German who immigrated into...
LYDDA – City in Palestine, later named Diospolis; situated one hour northeast of Ramleh, about three hours southeast of Jaffa, and, according to the Talmud (Ma'as. Sh. v. 2; Beẓah 5a), a day's journey west of Jerusalem. It seems to have...
MANNHEIMER, ISAAC NOAH – Jewish preacher; born at Copenhagen Oct. 17, 1793; died at Vienna March 17, 1865. The son of a ḥazzan, he began the study of the Talmud at an early age, though not to the neglect of secular studies. On completing the course of...
MÖLLN (MOLIN) – Name of a family of Mayence. The name , which, according to D. Kaufmann ("Der Grabstein des R. Jacob ben Moses ha-Levi," in "Monatsschrift," xlii. 26), is to be read "Molin" rather than "Mölln," is not intended to indicate the...
PAKS CONFERENCE – Meeting of rabbis held Aug. 20 and 21, 1844, at the town of Paks, Hungary. The discussions in the Hungarian Parliament concerning the emancipation of the Jews produced in Hungary, as elsewhere in Europe, a demand for the reform...
POLLAK, JACOB – Founder of the Polish method of halakic and Talmudic study known as the Pilpul; born about 1460; died at Lublin 1541. He was a pupil of Jacob Margolioth of Nuremberg, with whose son Isaac he officiated in the rabbinate of Prague...
POPPÆA SABINA – Mistress and, after 62 C.E., second wife of the emperor Nero; died 65. She had a certain predilection for Judaism, and is characterized by Josephus ("Ant." xx. 8, § 11; "Vita," § 3) as θεοσεβής ("religious"). Some Jews, such as...
SCHWERIN, GÖTZ – Hungarian rabbi and Talmudist; born in 1760 at Schwerin-on-the-Warthe (Posen); died Jan. 15, 1845; educated at the yeshibot of Presburg and Prague. In 1796 he settled in Hungary, at first living the life of a private scholar in...
SINZHEIM, JOSEPH DAVID – First rabbi of Strasburg; born in 1745; died at Paris Feb. 11, 1812; son of R. Isaac Sinzheim of Treves and brother-in-law of Herz Cerfbeer. He was the most learned and prominent member of the Assembly of Notables convened by...
WAGENSEIL, JOHANN CHRISTOPH – German Christian Hebraist; born at Nuremberg Nov. 26, 1633; died at Altdorf Oct. 9, 1705. In 1667 he was made professor of history at Altdorf, and was professor of Oriental languages at the same university from 1674 to 1697,...
WAHRMANN, ISRAEL B. SOLOMON – Hungarian rabbi and Talmudist; born at Altofen, Hungary; died at Budapest June 24, 1824. He was called to the rabbinate of Pesth in 1799, and was the first officially recognized rabbi of the community, which developed rapidly...
WAHRMANN, JUDAH – Hungarian rabbi; son of Israel Wahrmann; born 1791; died at Pesth Nov. 14, 1868. He was appointed associate rabbi and teacher of religion at the gymnasium of Budapest on Feb. 9, 1851, and was the author of "Ma'areket...
WAHRMANN, MORITZ – Hungarian politician; grandson of Israel Wahrmann; born at Budapest Feb. 28, 1832; died there Nov. 26, 1892. He was educated at the Protestant gymnasium and the university of his native city, and entered his father's mercantile...
WAY, LEWIS – English clergyman; born at Denham, Bucks, England, Feb. 11, 1772; died in London Jan. 26, 1840. He was educated at Merton College, Oxford, and was called to the bar in 1797, but entered the Church and devoted to Church purposes...