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Isaac Broydé,

(Office Editor), Doctor of the University of Paris, France; formerly Librarian of the Alliance Israélite Universelle, Paris, France; New York City.

Contributions:
CONEGLIANO – A prominent Jewish family of northern Italy. The spelling "Conian," according to Kaufmann, is a misreading of the Hebrew . It takes its name from the town of Conegliano, which at one time belonged to the republic of Venice. A...
CONEGLIANO – A prominent Jewish family of northern Italy. The spelling "Conian," according to Kaufmann, is a misreading of the Hebrew . It takes its name from the town of Conegliano, which at one time belonged to the republic of Venice. A...
CONQUE, ABRAHAM BEN LEVI – Cabalist; lived at Hebron, Palestine, in the second half of the seventeenth century. Swayed by his cabalistic studies, Conque threw himself into the Shabbethaian movement, and became one of the most earnest apostles of the...
CONRAD (CUNTZE) OF WINTERTHUR – Burgomaster of Strasburg during the Black Death, in 1348. Together with the councilors Goffe Sturm (Schöppe) and Peter Schwarber, he opposed the mob which, believing the Jews had caused the Black Death by poisoning the wells and...
CONSTANTINE – City in Algeria; capital of the department of the same name. In ancient times it was the capital of Numidia. Jews lived there as early as the first centuries of the common era, as is attested by epitaphs found in several places...
CONSTANTINOPLE – Capital of the Ottoman empire, situated on the Bosporus; the "Byzantium" of the ancients. The earliest official document hitherto discovered relating to the Jews of Constantinople dates from 390. A decree of that year (Feb. 23)...
CONSTANTINOPLE – Capital of the Ottoman empire, situated on the Bosporus; the "Byzantium" of the ancients. The earliest official document hitherto discovered relating to the Jews of Constantinople dates from 390. A decree of that year (Feb. 23)...
CONVERTS TO CHRISTIANITY, MODERN – The number of post-Mendelssohnian Jews who abandoned their ancestral faith is very large. According to Heman in Herzog-Hauck, "Real-Encyc." (x. 114), the number of converts during the nineteenth century exceeded 100,000; Salmon,...
COSIN, LEWI – Rabbi at Salonica, and later a preacher at Venice; born in 1573; died in 1625. He was the author of a collection of sermons arranged in the order of the Sabbatic sections, and entitled "'Aliyat Ḳir Ḳeṭannah" (A Little Chamber in...
COVENANT – Biblical Data: An agreement between two contracting parties, originally sealed with blood; a bond, or a law; a permanent religious dispensation. The old, primitive way of concluding a covenant ( , "to cut a covenant") was for...
CRESCAS, ASTRUC DON – Provençal scholar; lived probably at Perpignan, in the fourteenth century. Samuel, son of Solomon Shalom of Perpignan (compare Azulai, "Shem ha-Gedolim," p. 188), consulted Crescas on a halakic question in a complicated case of...
CRETE – Island in the Mediterranean, about 55 miles south of the Morea. Jews had settled there long before the Christian era (I Macc. xv. 23 mentions Jews in Gortynia, Crete). Philo speaks of the Jews of Crete ("Legatio ad Caium," ed....
CRIMEA – A peninsula of southern Russia, on the northern shore of the Black Sea. It was formerly known as Krim-Tartary, and in ancient times as Tauric Chersonese. As shown by inscriptions (see Bosporus) unearthed in various parts of the...
CRISPIN, ISAAC IBN – Spanish moralist and poet; lived at the beginning of the twelfth century. Judah al-Ḥarizi praises him among the renowned poets of the twelfth century; and, judging from the title ("The Great Prince"), which he prefixes to...
CZERNOWITZ – Capital of the province of Bukowina, Austria, situated near the banks of the Pruth, about 150 miles from Lemberg. Jews were living here and in a few other places in Bukowina when the Austrians took possession of the country in...
DANIEL BEN JUDAH – Liturgical poet, who lived at Rome in the middle of the fourteenth century. He was the grandfather of Daniel ben Samuel ha-Rofe, rabbi at Tivoli. According to Luzzatto, Daniel ben Judah was the author of the well-known hymn...
DANON, BERAKAH BEN YOM-ṬOB – Talmudical scholar; lived at Jerusalem in the first half of the nineteenth century. He was the author of a work entitled "Bad Ḳodesh" (Holy Linen), containing sermons, and novellæ on Maimonides' "Yad." It was published in...
DANON, JOSEPH BEN JACOB BEN MOSES IBN – Hebraist and Talmudist; born at Belgrade about 1620; died at London toward the end of the seventeenth century. He was descended from an old Spanish family which had settled at Belgrade several generations earlier. Having...
DAVID BEN AARON IBN ḤUSAIN – Moroccan poet; lived in the second half of the eighteenth century. At the end of a collection of dirges of Moroccan poets written in commemoration of the destruction of the Temple, there is one composed by David in 1790, in...
DAVID BEN BOAZ – Karaite scholar; flourished in the tenth century. He is reported to have been the fifth in the line of descent from Anan, the founder of Karaism (Anan, Saul, Jehoshaphat, and Boaz, father of David). The Karaite chronicler...
DAVID BONET BONJORN – Convert to Christianity; lived in Catalonia in the second half of the fourteenth century. He is believed to have been the son of the astronomer Jacob Poel. In consequence of the persecutions of 1391 he embraced Christianity,...
DAVID BEN ELIJAH – Hebrew scholar of the eighteenth century. He translated into Hebrew, under the title "Leshon Zahab" (A Tongue of Gold), the second Targum to Esther. The translation was published at Constantinople in
DAVID GERSON – Rabbi at Reshid, Egypt; flourished in the middle of the seventeenth century. He was a contemporary of Mordecai ben Judah ha-Levi, author of "Darke No'am," in which are given some of Gerson's responsa. He is also mentioned as a...
DAVID BEN ḤAYYIM HA-KOHEN – Rabbi at Corfu, and later at Patros, Greece, at the beginning of the sixteenth century. He was a pupil of Judah Minz, and a contemporary of Elijah Mizraḥi and Moses Alashkar, with whom he maintained a correspondence, though...
DAVID IBN HIN – Cabalist; lived at Salonica at the end of the sixteenth and at the beginning of the seventeenth century. Although blind, he devoted himself to cabalistic studies, and published the "Sefer Gerushim" of Moses Cordovero (Venice,...