JewishEncyclopedia.com

The unedited full-text of the 1906 Jewish Encyclopedia
- Phrase search: "names of god"
- Exclude terms: "names of god" -zerah
- Volume/Page: v9 p419
- Diacritics optional: Ḥanukkah or hanukkah
- Search by Author: altruism author:Hirsch
search tips & recommendations

Isaac Broydé,

(Office Editor), Doctor of the University of Paris, France; formerly Librarian of the Alliance Israélite Universelle, Paris, France; New York City.

Contributions:
BRIELI JUDAH LEON BEN ELIEZER – Rabbi in Mantua; born about 1643; died in 1722.Brieli, besides being a high Talmudical authority, as is shown in the responsa of his contemporaries Ishmael Coen, Morpurgo, and others who asked his opinion on halakic questions,...
BRITTANY – Ancient province of France corresponding to the present departments of Finistère, Côtes-du-Nord, Morbihan, Ile et Vilaine, and Loire-Inférieure. The name occurs in Hebrew writings under various forms, such as . Little...
BRUSSELS – Capital of Belgium. There are no records as to the date when Jews first settled in Brussels; but as many of them were scattered over the province of Brabant at the time of the Romans, it may be assumed that they established...
BÜDINGER, MAX – Austrian historian; born April 1, 1828, at Cassel, Germany; died at Vienna Feb. 23, 1902; son of Moses Mordecai Büdinger.Büdinger devoted himself from 1847 to 1851 to the study of history at the universities of Marburg, Bonn,...
BÜDINGER, MOSES ISRAEL BEN ISAAC – Teacher at Metz at the end of the eighteenth century and the beginning of the nineteenth. He devoted himself to Hebrew grammar and literature and trained a large number of grammarians and writers of elegant Hebrew. Büdinger was...
BULAT (V03p425001.jpg), ABRAHAM IBN – Talmudic scholar; lived in Spain in the fifteenth century. He was the disciple of Isaac de Leon, and in a vigorous dispute of the latter with Isaac Gayyal concerning a halakic decision, Balat took the part of his master and...
BUSNASH, NAPHTALI – Chief of the Algerian Jews and statesman; born at Algiers in the middle of the eighteenth century; assassinated June 28, 1805. He was engaged—first alone, and later with Bakri Brothers—in the grain trade, of which the dey Ḥasan,...
BUZAGLIO, BUZAGLI – Cabalist; born in Morocco (where his father was "rosh yeshibah") at the beginning of the eighteenth century; died in 1780. He was a disciple of the cabalist Abraham Azulai, rabbi of Morocco, and filled the position of dayyan....
BYELAYA TZERKOV – Town in the government of Kiev, Russia. Its Jewish settlement must have been formed after 1550, when the waywode of Kiev, having built there a castle, attracted many inhabitants to the town by granting them numerous...
CABRET – Spanish translator; lived in Spain toward the end of the fourteenth century. The surname "Cabret" or "Cabrit," borne by several persons, is derived, according to Gross ("Gallia Judaica," p. 474), from a Spanish locality, Cabreta...
CAGLIARI, ABRAHAM DA – Rabbi at Cagliari, Sardinia, in the eighth century. He is mentioned by Antonio di Tharos, the historian of that epoch, and by Delotone, in his "Ritmo di Gialeto." The latter relates that Abraham interpreted many Phenician...
CAHEN, ALBERT – French composer; born at Paris Jan. 8, 1846; a pupil of Cæsar Franck (composition) and Mme. Szarvady (pianoforte). He made himself known to the musical world by thefollowing compositions: (1) "Jean le Précurseur," a Biblical...
CAHEN, ISIDORE – French scholar and journalist; born at Paris in 1826; died there March 6, 1902. After having brilliantly completed his education at the Collége Charlemagne, he entered the Ecole Normale in the section of philosophy, having for...
CAHEN, SAMUEL – French Hebraist and journalist; born at Metz Aug. 4, 1796; died at Paris Jan. 8, 1862. He was brought up at Mayence; pursuing a course of rabbinical studies and devoting, at the same time, much attention to modern languages and...
CALAMANI, JOSHUA ABRAHAM BEN SIMḤAH – Italian Talmudist; born at Venice in 1704. The surname "Calamani" is, according to Steinschneider, derived from the German "Kalman" or "Kalonymus," borne by an ancestor of Joshua. Calamani was a precocious child, the only work...
CALIMANI, SIMḤAH (SIMON) BEN ABRAHAM – Venetian rabbi and author; died at Venice Aug. 2, 1784. He was a versatile writer, and equally prominent as linguist, poet, orator, and Talmudist. During his rabbinate Calimani was engaged as corrector at the Hebrew...
CALIXTUS II. (GUIDO OF BURGUNDY) – One hundred and sixty-seventh pope (1119-24); born at Quigney, near Besançon, France; died at Rome Dec. 12, 1124. His attitude toward the Jews was a very favorable one. On entering Rome, after having defeated the antipope...
CANTORI, JOSHUA DEI – Assailant of the Talmud at Cremona in 1559. According to Steinschneider, he belonged to the family Cantarini ( ). In consequence of a dispute with Joseph Ottolenghi, who was head of the Talmudical school of Cremona, Cantori, in...
CAPADOCE, ABRAHAM – Convert to Christianity; born at Amsterdam 1795; died there Dec. 16, 1874. His parents, who were Portuguese Jews, gave him an entirely secular education, wishing him to study medicine. After having completed his medical studies...
CAPEFIGUE, JEAN-BAPTISTE HONORÉ-RAYMOND – French Christian publicist and historian; born at Marseilles 1802; died at Paris Dec. 23, 1872. Among many historical works, Capefigue wrote a history of the Jews, entitled "Histoire Philosophique des Juifs Depuis la Décadence...
CAPESTANG – Village in the department of Hérault, near Béziers, France. Several official documents testify to the presence of many Jews there in the thirteenth century. Simon ben Meïr, in his work, "Milḥemet Miẓwah," relates that about 1245...
CARBEN, VICTOR OF – Jewish convert; lived at Cologne (1442-1515). Like most converts, Victor endeavored to show his zeal for his new religion by writing against his former coreligionists. When the Jews were banished from the diocese of Cologne...
CARCASSONNE – Town in the department of Aude, France; the Carcaso or Carcassio of the Romans. It is variously transcribed in Hebrew as , etc.Under Roger II. Although the settlement of Jews at Carcassonne goes as far back as the early...
CARCASSONNE, ADOLPHE JOSEPH – French poet; born at Marseilles, 1826; died Sept. 22, 1891. His principal works are: (1) "Premières Lueurs," a selection of poems (1852); (2) "Le Jugement de Déea," opera in four acts (1860); (3) "La Fille du Franc-Juge," drama...
CARDINAL – Translator; lived at the end of the twelfth century and the beginning of the thirteenth, probably in southern France. At the request of Joseph ben Baruch, who, according to Zunz, traveled from France to Jerusalem by way of Egypt...