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The unedited full-text of the 1906 Jewish Encyclopedia
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TUS, JACOB – See Tawus.
TUSHIYYAH – Publishing establishment founded in Warsaw in 1896, which, though a private enterprise, is in reality a Hebrew publication society striving to further the development and spread of Neo-Hebrew literature. Its founder,...
TYCHSEN, OLAUS GERHARD – Christian Hebraist and Orientalist; born at Tondern in Sleswick, Denmark, Dec. 14, 1734; died at Rostock, Germany, Dec. 30, 1815. He studied rabbinics at the University of Halle, and journeyed through Germany and Denmark in the...
TYPES, ANTHROPOLOGICAL – Correlated norms of racial qualities. Individuals who present an interrelation between the color of the hair and that of the eyes are considered typical representatives of their race. In the blond races fair hair is generally...
TYPOGRAPHY – The art of printing. The invention of printing was welcomed by the Jews as "the art of writing with many pens." From the time of the earlier printers reference is made to their craft as "holy work" ("'Abodat ha-Ḳodesh"). It may...
TYRE – Principal city of Phenicia. By "the strong city Tyre," mentioned in Josh. xix. 29 and II Sam. xxiv. 7 as marking the frontier of Israel (Asher), is evidently meant not the main city, but an outpost in the mountains protecting...
TYRIA – City of Asia Minor, sixty miles from Smyrna. Its Jewish community is of ancient date, the earliest members having arrived at Tyria before the Spanish expulsion; but catastrophes have reduced the Jewish population to...
TYRNAU – Manufacturing town of western Hungary. It was the scene of two martyrdoms of Jews: the first, in 1494, when fourteen men and two women gave up their innocent lives, as a manuscript dirge of the Cracow community recounts; the...
TYROL – Crownland of Austria. The earliest documents referring to its Jews date from thebeginning of the fourteenth century. The statement, found in the "Privilegium Ecclesiæ S. Stephani" in Rendena (Hormayr, "Gesch. Tirols," 1808,...